Treating The Seriously Injured


My mother and I are night owls. This weekend we found ourselves up around three in the morning talking in the living room. While everyone else in the house quietly slumbered she spoke words to me that I haven’t been able to stop thinking of. I have always been a very ambitious person. I work hard and strive for the best. I have a natural zest for life that I’ve been able to keep through the hell I’ve gone through. I laugh and smile often though my wings have been fractured. I simply want to fly. My flight was never about the journey but more the ability to soar. To try. To thrive. To set sight, aim, and achieve. This has always been my way.

My mother reminded me of words I spoke when I was around 20-22. I said that I didn’t want to get to 40 or 50 years old and see that life had passed me by. I have done much in this life but the situations she were speaking of are matters directly of the heart. She told me that I were in those very years right now. That if I didn’t push harder and renew my focus then I would do just that. The storm I am exiting lasted well beyond its season.

This is not the conversation we had however this is one of several blogs inspired by that conversation.

Any medical professional will tell you that there is serious danger in moving a critically injured or ill person. Not only can you cause additional pain but you may complicate their recovery. If I were a preacher I would preach an entire sermon of what happens when we allow people who have been emotionally injured into our lives, attempting to move them into what we consider safer ground. Those times we put both them and ourselves in great danger.

Some of the common questions surrounding treating an injured person include:

How do I decide if it is safe to move an injured person? Get to know them without involving your feelings. Do not allow yourself to be so caught up in the flesh that you can’t see the spirit. Acting out of haste confuses your judgment. Just because it feels good doesn’t mean that it’s meant to be. Remember the old saying, “everything that’s good to you ain’t good for you”. Apply where necessary. How do you decide? You don’t. You pray about it and allow God to.

What are some first aid techniques? Pray together. Lead by Example. Be patient, not complacent. Support without enabling. Allow them to vent without bearing their burden. Remember you are a confidant, not a psychologist. Even if you are a professional, set and enforce boundaries.

How to treat fatal wounds? Whether accidental or inflicted intentionally, a fatal wound is direct permission to reevaluate that person’s place in your life. Fatal wounds come in the form of aggressiveness, self-centeredness, manipulation, frequent criticism, verbal/physical/spiritual abuse, not at a place to let go of the past, dishonesty, jealousy, actions that cause you to negatively act outside of yourself, emotionally unavailable, or even ostracize you from family and friends. There is a long list and what you consider fatal may be different for someone else.

How do I keep bystanders away from an injured person? Again, you are not a professional. What you can do is monitor your circle and be mindful of the information you share. There are some people who always involve themselves in drama. I consider those type of people to also be fatal but that’s just me. The more opinions in the pot, the messier it gets.

Should I give the injured person medicine to help with their pain? Scores of people self-medicate their problems instead of seeking the professional help they need. Self-medicating with drugs, alcohol, sex, overspending, etc, is dangerous. Not only does this not help the person heal but you can find yourself caught up in a situation with them.

I’m not a preacher or psychologist but I’ve learned my share along the way.

No. Nope. HELL NO! Never Again.

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